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KWVE gets rid of hyms in favor of teaching/preaching

So KWVE is similar to KKLA now that KWVE has dropped hyms in favor of teaching. I liked the hyms they played
Sad to see it go. Now the only place for contemporary Christian music is kfsh 95.9 FM. I wonder why they dropped hyms to begin with. Guess I won't know why.
 
So KWVE is similar to KKLA now that KWVE has dropped hyms in favor of teaching. I liked the hyms they played
Sad to see it go. Now the only place for contemporary Christian music is kfsh 95.9 FM. I wonder why they dropped hyms to begin with. Guess I won't know why.
Or KKLQ (K-Love) 100.3.
 
I guess it's the same for NPR affiliates. A few decades ago, they aired Morning Edition and All Things Considered in drive time, and played Classical Music the rest of the day. Over time, nearly all dropped Mozart and Beethoven for NPR talk shows the rest of the day. They found that the talk shows got more donations than music. Maybe the same is true for stations like KWVE-FM that find Christian Talk and Teaching shows generate more donations than music.

I think the original poster, 30 James, wants to hear more conservative hymns, not the Christian Contemporary pop music heard on K-Love or The Fish. Maybe Air 1, the EMF network for Worship Music, is more to his liking. But it's only on a few low-power stations in Southern California, all on 92.7 (KYLA Fountain Valley, KYZA Adelanto and KYRA Thousand Oaks).
 
I guess it's the same for NPR affiliates. A few decades ago, they aired Morning Edition and All Things Considered in drive time, and played Classical Music the rest of the day. Over time, nearly all dropped Mozart and Beethoven for NPR talk shows the rest of the day. They found that the talk shows got more donations than music. Maybe the same is true for stations like KWVE-FM that find Christian Talk and Teaching shows generate more donations than music.

I think the original poster, 30 James, wants to hear more conservative hymns, not the Christian Contemporary pop music heard on K-Love or The Fish. Maybe Air 1, the EMF network for Worship Music, is more to his liking. But it's only on a few low-power stations in Southern California, all on 92.7 (KYLA Fountain Valley, KYZA Adelanto and KYRA Thousand Oaks).
Does it stream? Or is there some deep-seated moral obligation to stay tethered to a radio receiver for one's audio programming even if the programming one wants is easily obtainable on your PC or phone?
 
I guess it's the same for NPR affiliates. A few decades ago, they aired Morning Edition and All Things Considered in drive time, and played Classical Music the rest of the day. Over time, nearly all dropped Mozart and Beethoven for NPR talk shows the rest of the day. They found that the talk shows got more donations than music.
It wasn't really the quantity or amount of donations, it was that the donors were getting extremely old. IIRC when my local NPR station dropped its midday music, the median donor during classical hours was 63 years old, and rising almost as fast as the calendar turned.

I wouldn't be surprised if the same kind of phenomenon happened here. A whole lot of people have primarily seen praise music in their church their whole lives.
 
I wouldn't be surprised if the same kind of phenomenon happened here. A whole lot of people have primarily seen praise music in their church their whole lives.
It was around 1970 that churches and religious broadcasters began to realize that 18th and 19th Century hymns were doing nothing to attract new followers at a time church attendance was declining due to membership dying off. Boomers and subsequent generations had no interest in the religious musical styles their great-grandparents had listened to. Thus the rise of CCM and P&W in revamped contemporary services. Just like any radio format, you target a demographic range, not the same specific people who are aging out.
 
At least on the public radio side, it's not just about aging but also about format consistency. The audience that tunes in for Morning Edition and ATC generally wants more of that same sort of content the rest of the day, and the audience that tunes in midday for classical doesn't necessarily want to listen to or support news.

There are still some quite successful classical stations out there, even within the reality that it tends to be an older (but often wealthy!) audience/donor base - KUSC right there in LA, KING-FM in Seattle, and heck, we do very well with the format at WXXI Classical in Rochester. But the common denominator is that it's not block programmed. It's 24/7 classical music, because audiences want consistency.
 
So KWVE is similar to KKLA now that KWVE has dropped hyms in favor of teaching. I liked the hyms they played
Sad to see it go. Now the only place for contemporary Christian music is kfsh 95.9 FM. I wonder why they dropped hyms to begin with. Guess I won't know why.
What about 92.7 and 100.3
 
Likely because donations were down when hymns played? Or they decided a share of listening area donations from a program beat zero from airing hymns. And if that music is gone, they can readjust their music licensing fees they pay monthly to a lower fee.
I think you just guessed it-lower music licensing fees
 
There are still some quite successful classical stations out there, even within the reality that it tends to be an older (but often wealthy!) audience/donor base - KUSC right there in LA, KING-FM in Seattle, and heck, we do very well with the format at WXXI Classical in Rochester. But the common denominator is that it's not block programmed. It's 24/7 classical music, because audiences want consistency.
I listen to Vermont Public Classical here and used to listen to WUMB when I lived in Connecticut. Both are primarily classical but have specialty programs in other genres in the evening and on weekends -- show tunes, standards, jazz, folk. Is this peculiar to New England, or do the classical stations you mention break format occasionally as well?
 
Thanks i forgot about klove ill stream it on my phone
If you are in the inland area (Temecula/North San Diego County) there is also KSDW on 88.9 and 96.9 - a mix of teachings and CCM. I'm not Christian but I have heard the station several times - they seem to be locally run and well produced.
 
At least on the public radio side, it's not just about aging but also about format consistency. The audience that tunes in for Morning Edition and ATC generally wants more of that same sort of content the rest of the day, and the audience that tunes in midday for classical doesn't necessarily want to listen to or support news.

There are still some quite successful classical stations out there, even within the reality that it tends to be an older (but often wealthy!) audience/donor base - KUSC right there in LA, KING-FM in Seattle, and heck, we do very well with the format at WXXI Classical in Rochester. But the common denominator is that it's not block programmed. It's 24/7 classical music, because audiences want consistency.
One of the most successful and unique is Chicago's 98.7 WFMT. A truly great radio station...
 
Indeed, I was wondering if KFRN 1280 airs hyms or is it just spoken word now?
They do still air music and spoken word. About half or more of the music played now is in the 1950's, 1960's-style that Harold Camping's management aired and the rest is a bit more modern. Hymns, Him's ... no Himzz!
 
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If you are in the inland area (Temecula/North San Diego County) there is also KSDW on 88.9 and 96.9 - a mix of teachings and CCM. I'm not Christian but I have heard the station several times - they seem to be locally run and well produced.
Actually KSDW Temecula is owned by Calvary Chapel Costa Mesa... the same folks who own KWVE-FM. In fact, the station is operated from KWVE-FM's studios, along with co-owned KWVE 1110 (newly acquired from Disney) and KWTH 89.1 Barstow. I believe the schedules are all pretty much the same.
 
Indeed, I was wondering if KFRN 1280 airs hymns or is it just spoken word now?
The Family Radio schedule is mostly worship music. It really sounds nothing like it did under Harold Camping. The 1950s and 60s style rural gospel music that he favored is gone.

There are some spoken word talk and teaching shows that pop up during the day and especially on Sundays. But most hours are automated worship music with some friendly reminders about Family Radio and donations.
 


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