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FCC Incentive for Local Programming

Let's use EMF as the example. How does the FCC tell EMF that their license renewal is stipulated on them doing local programming. Do you really think that will incentivize EMF to hire live & local staffs for K-Love? Or do local news? Really?
EMF stations do air local and regional public service programming... that is legitimately local and or regional and of general interest

Now, say, the same thing might air in SE WY (Laramie/Cheyenne), Western NE (Scottsbluff, etc) and Northern Colorado but they have people whos job it is specifically and solely to do those programs and they regularly go out to the regions they serve to do boots on the ground work.

I have met and talked to one of the guys that does that work.
 
What current rules are they exempt from?

The ones that are most often mentioned in this kind of discussion are (with response in parentheses):
- Translators outside coverage area of originating station. (Non-coms of all kinds can do this).
- No studio in City of License (No longer a requirement for any station).
- No local office (another "not required of anyone" issue.).
- No local programming (not a requirement for any station).
- No local Public Affairs shows (not a requirement for any station. PA is "issues" and "answers").
- No local news coverage (not a requirement for any station)

By some peoples reasoning the KSKO satelitor stations (KNIB, KSKC, etc.. nto translators) wouldnt qualify for expedited license renewal because we dont have a studio or local office.. and sleetmute a town of less then 100 people, has no local programming.. same for nikolai....... crooked creek etc.. towns of less than 100.. and they simulcast KSKO

and before anyone says.. well how much can go on there and you cant really expect to have staff there... ive seen radio nerds claim stations in communities not a ton bigger should have this or not

and before you say.. if you cant staff or have a studio there, why do you have a station? We provide critical information such as weather, safety and wildfire info that you won't get anywhere else or as easily anywhere else...... and our region,while big.. is close knit and related.
 
EMF stations do air local and regional public service programming... that is legitimately local and or regional and of general interest

My question was how does an expedited license renewal incentivize them to so more local programming.

Rosenworcel's proposal wasn't about public service programming, but actual local programming:

she has circulated a rulemaking to her fellow commissioners that would incentivize the production of local programming. It would do that by prioritizing the FCC’s processing of applications for license renewal or station sales filed by radio and television stations that provide locally originated programming.

Key words: Locally originated programming. I know for a fact that their base programming originates from a central location.
 
My question was how does an expedited license renewal incentivize them to so more local programming.

Rosenworcel's proposal wasn't about public service programming, but actual local programming:



Key words: Locally originated programming. I know for a fact that their base programming originates from a central location.

It does but the public affairs stuff originates locally even if not recorded locally

And EMF has.. and ive herd it.. broken into programming on a local level to alert of a major disaster.. when wildfires were in going on a few years ago, i heard sacramento specific wildfire information on their sacramento signal that was recorded at HQ up the road and inserted locally.. and no, they dont like have a studio justy for sacramento.... was done via the magic of individually addresssable satellite recievers
 
The ones you list
Those are not rules that apply to either non-coms or any station at this time; no religious station is exempted from any rule that other non-coms have to comply with.
 
The issue as I see it is that at the end of the day, sadly, none of this will matter or make a difference when it comes to the long-term trends of radio listenership. (Everyone will just do the bare minimum of any new requirements) Most have learned how to interact and find out information within their local community in alternative ways and they just simply don't need the radio anymore to do that.
 
The issue as I see it is that at the end of the day, sadly, none of this will matter or make a difference when it comes to the long-term trends of radio listenership. (Everyone will just do the bare minimum of any new requirements) Most have learned how to interact and find out information within their local community in alternative ways and they just simply don't need the radio anymore to do that.

The fact is that the listeners made their choice even when they have live & local radio options available. Why? Because no mass medium can provide all of the specific information a listener wants. The station traffic or weather report can't cover every street & neighborhood. Just the major stories.
 
The fact is that the listeners made their choice even when they have live & local radio options available. Why? Because no mass medium can provide all of the specific information a listener wants. The station traffic or weather report can't cover every street & neighborhood. Just the major stories.
Exactly, there isn't a problem here that needs solving.
 
The fact is that the listeners made their choice even when they have live & local radio options available. Why? Because no mass medium can provide all of the specific information a listener wants.
Well, a newspaper, unlike radio, can provide every last detail about those storms, earthquakes and highway pileups, in a form you can clip and save for years to come. You just have to wait a day to read it.
 
And hows that been working for local newspapers?
It never did, insofar as providing immediate information goes. Wasn't intended to be taken seriously, although local papers still sell plenty of extra copies after significant local, or even national, events. But with the physical papers giving way to online-only or nothing at all, that's going to disappear, too.
 
It never did, insofar as providing immediate information goes. Wasn't intended to be taken seriously, although local papers still sell plenty of extra copies after significant local, or even national, events. But with the physical papers giving way to online-only or nothing at all, that's going to disappear, too.
Wait, they sell 'plenty' of extra copies?? Local newspapers are closing up all over the country.
 
It appears Chair Rosenworcel has just released the NPRM (Jan. 17) for the "Priority Application Review for Broadcast Stations that Provide Local Journalism or Other Locally Originated Programming." The GOP commissioners have deemed it a crock and a back door return of the main studio rule.

 
It appears Chair Rosenworcel has just released the NPRM (Jan. 17) for the "Priority Application Review for Broadcast Stations that Provide Local Journalism or Other Locally Originated Programming." The GOP commissioners have deemed it a crock and a back door return of the main studio rule.

As I said in my previous post, I fail to see what such a prioritization does for the station. In other words, how does this encourage stations to do more local programming? License renewal is not a reality TV show or contest where the first in line wins a prize. It's simply part of the regulatory process, where the timing of the process is 100% to the benefit of the commission. As long as the station files its renewal on time, the rest is up to them. It's a fake rule.
 
As I said in my previous post, I fail to see what such a prioritization does for the station. In other words, how does this encourage stations to do more local programming? License renewal is not a reality TV show or contest where the first in line wins a prize. It's simply part of the regulatory process, where the timing of the process is 100% to the benefit of the commission. As long as the station files its renewal on time, the rest is up to them. It's a fake rule.
According to the NPRM, "…applications that have holds related to the applicant’s failure to comply with Commission rules, or where petitions to deny or informal objections have been filed, generally require additional staff research and processing time before they can be processed…With respect to these more “complex” applications, we propose that the staff first would consider those that are filed together with a certification that the station provides programming that is locally originated." So, in other words, these complex applications would be expedited if the station shows a certificate that it has aired local programming.

But if there are no issues with the renewal, a "simple" application in other words, the NPRM says, "With respect to those licensees that either cannot, or choose not, to provide a certification, the Commission staff will process the licensee’s application pursuant to its normal procedures. Applications that do not include a certification will not be scrutinized or processed differently as a substantive matter than applications with a certification, other than the prioritization proposal discussed above." So simple applications will be processed in the normal way with the normal turnaround time. It's kind of a nothing rule, unless you anticipate problems come renewal time.
 
So, in other words, these complex applications would be expedited if the station shows a certificate that it has aired local programming.

That's great, but once the station has filed on time, the rest is up to the commission. There is no incentive for the station. Other than they can pat themselves on the back. They don't even receive an award or certificate from the FCC for all of their wonderful local programming. Just the knowledge that in the vast bureaucracy known as the FCC, their application received priority. The incentive is mainly for the FCC, who can claim they somehow encouraged local programming. When in fact the didn't.
 
That's great, but once the station has filed on time, the rest is up to the commission. There is no incentive for the station. Other than they can pat themselves on the back. They don't even receive an award or certificate from the FCC for all of their wonderful local programming. Just the knowledge that in the vast bureaucracy known as the FCC, their application received priority. The incentive is mainly for the FCC, who can claim they somehow encouraged local programming. When in fact the didn't.
I agree. If you timely file a renewal and an issue crops up with it, what is the FCC going to do? Slow walk the process because you didn't include some silly certification? It's bizarre. Rosenworcel said she was inspired by the Children's Television Act. Sorry, but that's a lousy model to crib from.
 
Rosenworcel said she was inspired by the Children's Television Act. Sorry, but that's a lousy model to crib from.

Especially when you read what the CTA says:

The Children's Television Act requires each U.S. broadcast television station to air programming specifically designed to serve the educational and informational needs of children. It also limits the amount of time broadcasters, cable operators, and satellite providers can devote to advertisements during children's programs.

If she wanted to emulate the CTA she should have required radio stations to air a certain amount of local programming. This doesn't do that. Not even slightly.
 


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