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Time for khti to try out classic rock

That's the void left in the IE a classic rock format playing 70's and 80's. If they do it Right they could attract the 25 to 54 age group especially Hispanics. I hope they take my suggestion to heart otherwise they should just turn in their license and stop bleeding money.
 
I don't think Classic Rock has much of an appeal for Hispanics in the Inland Empire. If you trace your roots to a rural part of Mexico, the local radio stations weren't playing much Springsteen or The Who as you grew up. As David has told us, it was only in the larger cities that radio stations played English-language music and that was aimed mostly at an upscale audience. But it is odd that the IE has no Classic Rock station. KCAL-FM is Rock but Active Rock. And some folks can pick up KLOS from Los Angeles.

However, KHTI is a Class A station powered at only 180 watts. So it's never going to be a big factor in the Riverside-San Bernardino market. Its tower is north of San Bernardino so that city is covered pretty well. But it isn't great in Riverside. By contrast, KFRG is 50,000 watts, KOLA is 30,000 watts on a tall tower and KLYY is 72,000 watts. But I assume KHTI 103.9 has enough listeners to make a small profit.
 
As Gregg suggests, if classic rock could work in the IE, KCAL would be classic rock. (Active Rock is a tough format to make work!)
 
103.9, throws its flame from lake arrowhead village and in the early 90s had veteran kgbs los angeles talent bob morgan as morning man under the call letters kbon. To get box office morgan to anchor their air force, kbon appeared to be ratings popular back then. My family and i were living out of state by 2000, so i dont know why or when kbon went away.
 
That's the void left in the IE a classic rock format playing 70's and 80's. If they do it Right they could attract the 25 to 54 age group especially Hispanics. I hope they take my suggestion to heart otherwise they should just turn in their license and stop bleeding money.
Huh?

After Blacks, Hispanics are the lowest cumers of rock in the US.

While there are stations all over Latin America that play English language rock (with Spanish language DJs), those stations are predominantly used by upper and middle income people there. Those are not the folks who emigrate to the US as they live a lot better where they are than they would in the US.

So what do first generation Hispanic immigrants listen to? In most of the US, Regional Mexican music and reggaetón among many of the younger (18-34) folks. In areas with mostly Caribbean immigrants, it's going to be salsa and bachata for those over 30 to 35.

Second generation will listen, mostly, rhythmic CHR and urban stations general market stations if they are under 35 to 40 and AC and classic hits if older. By third generation, it can be anything except stations in Spanish. For example, in the highly assimilated Hispanic market in San Antonio, the two main country stations have about half of their cume attributed to Hispanics!

But the average age of Hispanics in nearly all parts of the US (Florida is the exception) is over 10 years younger than non-Hispanic white folks. So any station that has 70's music as its core is going to fly right over the bulk of the Hispanic population.

And remember, "Hispanic" is not a race. It is simply a "commonality" based on coming from a Spanish speaking country or whose ancestors came from one (or from the huge parts of the US that were taken from Spain and Mexico).

[There are exceptions, such as the older Miami market but my generalizations definitely apply to SoCal]
 
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And some folks can pick up KLOS from Los Angeles.
KLOS covers the populated parts of the Riverside-San Bernardino market just as well as it covers Santa Clarita or Irvine.
 
KLOS covers the populated parts of the Riverside-San Bernardino market just as well as it covers Santa Clarita or Irvine.
There's substantial areas witin the city limits of San Bernardino, where KLOS and all the other Mt. Wilson stations don't come in clearly. The northern portions of Rialto and Fontana have similar issues likely due to Mt. Baldy blocking the clear line of sight to the Mt. Wilson transmitters.

In fact, I remember a family member of mine back in the 80's who was trying to pick up the LA TV stations. He mounted this huge high end TV antenna about 15 feet above his roof line and could still not clearly pickup the stations where the only really watchable signal was Channel 2. Yet if you turned the TV antenna towards the south, he could receive some of the TV stations from San Diego better than or at least as good as the LA stations.

As for KHTI (103.9), due to their signal limitations, I don't see how any format could be sucessful.
 
There's substantial areas witin the city limits of San Bernardino, where KLOS and all the other Mt. Wilson stations don't come in clearly. The northern portions of Rialto and Fontana have similar issues likely due to Mt. Baldy blocking the clear line of sight to the Mt. Wilson transmitters.
Just as areas in the Santa Clarita zone, the Lancaster/Palmdale area and many parts of southern Orange County have signal issues from the same Mt Wilson signals; all three of those areas are in the Los Angeles Metro Survey Area.
In fact, I remember a family member of mine back in the 80's who was trying to pick up the LA TV stations. He mounted this huge high end TV antenna about 15 feet above his roof line and could still not clearly pickup the stations where the only really watchable signal was Channel 2. Yet if you turned the TV antenna towards the south, he could receive some of the TV stations from San Diego better than or at least as good as the LA stations.
Of course, all of the Inland Empire is in the LA TV survey area.
As for KHTI (103.9), due to their signal limitations, I don't see how any format could be sucessful.
Yet their 60 dbu signal covers about 1.6 million people, certainly enough to create a market.
 
Just as areas in the Santa Clarita zone, the Lancaster/Palmdale area and many parts of southern Orange County have signal issues from the same Mt Wilson signals; all three of those areas are in the Los Angeles Metro Survey Area.

Of course, all of the Inland Empire is in the LA TV survey area.

Yet their 60 dbu signal covers about 1.6 million people, certainly enough to create a market.
There has to be a format that works. If KBON can Garner a 3.0 share in winter 1990 then they have to figure out what would be successful. 0.6 share this month is pathetic
 
That's the void left in the IE a classic rock format playing 70's and 80's. If they do it Right they could attract the 25 to 54 age group especially Hispanics. I hope they take my suggestion to heart otherwise they should just turn in their license and stop bleeding money.
I have never heard any of my IE Hispanic neighbors playing 70s and 80s American rock
 
Just as areas in the Santa Clarita zone, the Lancaster/Palmdale area and many parts of southern Orange County have signal issues from the same Mt Wilson signals; all three of those areas are in the Los Angeles Metro Survey Area.

Of course, all of the Inland Empire is in the LA TV survey area.

Yet their 60 dbu signal covers about 1.6 million people, certainly enough to create a market.
It should be mentioned that quite a few Mt Wilson FMs and others now have synchronized on-channel boosters located atop Oat Mt directly overlooking Santa Clarita.
 
I have never heard any of my IE Hispanic neighbors playing 70s and 80s American rock
However, in Latin America in upper scale neighborhoods that would not be unusual.
 
It should be mentioned that quite a few Mt Wilson FMs and others now have synchronized on-channel boosters located atop Oat Mt directly overlooking Santa Clarita.
Yep, and that is what they could do in Redlands or Moreno Valley if it were of value to them. But there is no interest by LA FMs in increasing Inland Empire listening or ratings. Zero $$ to gain.
 
I live in a non-upscale Hispanic area of Riverside (Casa Blanca) and all I hear coming out of people’s radios is what’s commonly called the “Regional Mexican” format
Generally, Mexicans who migrate to the US are from poor rural areas of Mexico. The average male education is 6th grade, and among women even less (per Mexican consulate in LA). Some of those migrants work hard and are capable and intelligent and build a business or profession and become better off. But, whatever their income, their music heritage is Regional Mexican for the most part.

In Latin America, though, the A, B and C+ income levels (roughly upper, upper middle and middle income out of an A-B-C-D-E spectrum used in Mexico and elsewhere) hardly ever migrate to the US. Most are in the larger cities, went to bilingual schools and private universities and live vastly better in their own country than they would in the US.

And those upper income and better educated folks in their own country often listen to stations that play all or some English language pop, rock and oldies music. I know: I owned several such stations in Ecuador years ago and have consulted and programmed many more all over Latin America since then.
 


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