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Denver Visiting Denver with a radio

Ehhh…Max has done some decent things with the two properties they’re now selling. Held out for a while despite having only rimshots.
As has been mentioned elsewhere (including by me), each of the two stations has on-channel boosters in a pocket of unincorporated Arapahoe County tucked between Denver and Aurora. The signals likely have problems in the northern parts of the metro, particularly Boulder, but in Denver and Aurora, there's no problem at all receiving them.
 
A 15 minute commercial break. Good god almighty. That's an easy way to lose listeners...fast. In Seattle, KNDD (The End) still does the '2 Minute Promise'. Three breaks per hour, 2 min. each, 6 minutes of ads. 54 minutes of music and/or DJ talk.
Here in Yakima, we're lucky to get half of those minutes in a commercial break. 3/4ths of the ads are local, and the other 1/4 at the end of the break are national spots, at least on Cherry FM and other stations here.

Colorado is full of great AAA and adult alternative stations, not just in Denver. There's KYSL 'Krystal 93' just to the west in Frisco, the Zephyr KZYR in Vail, KSPN in Aspen, for example. I've listened to The Colorado Sound here and there (105.5) and have enjoyed the music mix. Need to listen to KLVZ-810/95.3 on the stream sometime.
 
I’ve heard your ideas on other boards about what radio needs to do. You mentioned being more digital heavy for revenue. What are your ideas to get radio back to where it should be? How can we get there?

Not sure what you mean about "getting radio back." The future won't be like the past.
 
As has been mentioned elsewhere (including by me), each of the two stations has on-channel boosters in a pocket of unincorporated Arapahoe County tucked between Denver and Aurora. The signals likely have problems in the northern parts of the metro, particularly Boulder, but in Denver and Aurora, there's no problem at all receiving them.
The boosters are responsible for 95% or more of the listenership of the stations. They were engineered so that when someone is driving towards Denver on I-70 about 5-10 miles before E-470, as you come up over a hill the booster signals take over and do not interfere with the main. The Bloomfield/Boulder area is where they struggle mostly.
 
As has been mentioned elsewhere (including by me), each of the two stations has on-channel boosters in a pocket of unincorporated Arapahoe County tucked between Denver and Aurora. The signals likely have problems in the northern parts of the metro, particularly Boulder, but in Denver and Aurora, there's no problem at all receiving them.
I was in Denver back in July, and I had no problems receiving either one. I believe the boosters pulled in as far south as Castle Rock, and as far north as…I want to say Frederick? Main signals came in as far as Limon.
 
Find an alternate revenue stream. Dedicate your content structure to that. Use broadcast as a loss leader.

Kind of like what we're seeing Amazon Prime do with the NFL. Advertising will never keep up with the price of content.
From your mouth to God’s and the radio execs’ ears. I hope your ideas can come to fruition we just need a radio company to take a have on that. Kroq does a great job of selling digital. Why can’t others do the same? If 101.5 ran weed ads as they did, that couldnt be sold for digital opportunities?
 
Seems wildly exaggerated to me, too. The longest advertising break I've ever encountered on radio is about half that length. I wonder if the original poster was actually timing the break as it was happening or if he was just so frustrated waiting for the music to resume that the break seemed like it went on for a full quarter-hout.
Are you forgetting the 10+ minute breaks during the Stern show back in the day?

I never understood why any sponsor would be content being spot #14 in a break. Sales people I knew in several larger markets said Stern's show wasn't the easiest sell---even with huge numbers---because of the length of those spot breaks.
 
I never understood why any sponsor would be content being spot #14 in a break.

Because nobody buys one spot. They buy a flight, and they know what they're getting. They might be #14 in one break, and they might be #1 in the next break. The schedule specifies the rotation and how its accomplished. Also listeners tune in and out all the time. They don't just listen non-stop. They might tune in just in time for spot #14, and that may be the only spot they hear. It's a roll of the dice. Also if an advertiser wants to buy all the positions in an hour, so that they're the only sponsor, it's available and on the rate card. I've offered it to all my clients, and they prefer multiple impressions and long spot breaks. It's their choice, not ours.
 
Are you forgetting the 10+ minute breaks during the Stern show back in the day?
I was referring only to music formats. I didn't listen to Stern, but I do remember the long breaks during sports talk shows. I used to punch up a music preset if I was listening to sports talk in the car and one of those long stopsets came on, only came back if the topic that the host teased before the break was something I was interested in. I'd say half the time I never returned to the sports station. But I understand that's not the way "normal" listeners behave.
 
for those who complain about long spot breaks.. you have to make money since this is a business, how do you propose making changes?

If you tell me. .raise your rates.. anytone saying that has never worked in radio or hasnt in ages.. near impossible today

Been there, done that,burned the tshirt
 
for those who complain about long spot breaks.. you have to make money since this is a business, how do you propose making changes?

If you tell me. .raise your rates.. anytone saying that has never worked in radio or hasnt in ages.. near impossible today

Been there, done that,burned the tshirt
That’s a question for The Big A. He does have some interesting ideas
 
I hate to see the coming demise of FM radio. I always loved it. I never wanted to give up on it, but most of the stations around here (not all) pushed me into it. I almost never listen now. I listen to XM or my own purchased music. I certainly don't have any good answers. It's like a lot of things now; so much content and providers out there, and only so many dollars to be had.

TV news, and other news sources are in the same boat, along with TV programs. It's why we get only short TV seasons and series that are here and gone, not like a long time ago, when a series would last for years, with up to 30+ episodes a season. But we get many more choices too. It's like so much of our technology, it's a double edged sword.
 
I hate to see the coming demise of FM radio. I always loved it. I never wanted to give up on it, but most of the stations around here (not all) pushed me into it. I almost never listen now.

Perhaps it's more about you than about radio. Millions of other people feel differently. Just because you don't listen doesn't mean others don't.
 
It's rare for a medium to go away altogether. Certain uses of a medium will go away, and the number of media outlets will diminish. But I don't think even AM radio will go away. There will be fewer AM stations, as there probably should have been for the last 30 years or so, but some will still be around. It might even have more of a chance of going fully digital than FM since there will be less of an analog audience to lose at that point. FM stations will either go pins-up or will develop economic models less dependent on hard-to-measure (accurately) delivery of audiences to advertisers. In the online world, even Usenet is still around. It's in greatly diminished form, but it's still there. There are still people with aol.com email addresses. MySpace has a niche.

The one recent media-related functional technology that I can think of that's totally disappeared is photocomposition, which turned out to be a transitional technology between hot-metal typesetting and desktop (and direct-to-PDF/plate) publishing. Device-independent page description languages were transformational. Even so, Compugraphic, which was a leader in that field, still exists as a business unit within Agfa, though its product lineup is much different now. To be clear, all this came to fruition in the 1990s before newspapers succumbed to their own sets of economic pressures.
 
Perhaps it's more about you than about radio. Millions of other people feel differently. Just because you don't listen doesn't mean others don't.
Seriously? That would be pretty wild if I was the only one. Probably demise was too strong of a word that I shouldn't have used. I'm sure radio will be around in some form. I was thinking about it more from a money making standpoint, which I believe has become increasingly difficult.

I don't think it's just me who stopped listening. I know millions of people still listen, but also millions have stopped. And, by far, most listeners are only in the car, which means they are only listening for short periods.

This is some interesting data that some have probably already seen:


 
Seriously? That would be pretty wild if I was the only one.

I didn't say you're the "only one." I said millions of others feel differently. No form of media gets 100% any more. Sure at one time radio had a bit of an exclusive. At one time almost everyone used AM. Then a lot of people moved to FM. But we still see about 10-15% use AM radio right now. Only about 10% of people use satellite. The number has hovered around 30 million. They're about to experience a price increase due to rising music royalties. So get ready to pay more. I'm a Sirius stockholder, and I thank you for your business.

Thanks for all your links, but I've read them.
 


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