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Radio Personalities: Obsolete or Not

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the industry has done little or nothing to develop, nurture, promote and most importantly PAY that talent.

Absolutely untrue. As I said, "the industry" holds multiple talent conferences throughout the year designed to assist talent in improving what they do. "The industry" also has multiple talent coaches who will work privately to develop, nurture, and promote talent. There are lots of ways to make more money in the business if one is willing to look. Invest in yourself. Quite often, the talent creates their own impediments to their own success by restricting what they're willing to do. For some reason, Ryan Seacrest isn't hurting, and he works for the company some call "cheap channel." He also has a few "side hustles," as we saw New Year's Eve.
 
It sounds like you've never listened to Steve Harvey. Why would you? Doesn't mean he doesn't have something to say.

It sounds to me like you're the one who doesn't like him and now you're just talking in circles in your usual effort to derail the point and drag the discussion nowhere.

For some reason, Ryan Seacrest isn't hurting, and he works for the company some call "cheap channel."

Man, you are on a roll. The company has not been Clear Channel in close to ten years.
 
Absolutely untrue. As I said, "the industry" holds multiple talent conferences throughout the year designed to assist talent in improving what they do. "The industry" also has multiple talent coaches who will work privately to develop, nurture, and promote talent. There are lots of ways to make more money in the business if one is willing to look. Invest in yourself. Quite often, the talent creates their own impediments to their own success by restricting what they're willing to do. For some reason, Ryan Seacrest isn't hurting, and he works for the company some call "cheap channel." He also has a few "side hustles," as we saw New Year's Eve.

I've seen some people looking for work for years, but theyve severely geographically restricted where theyll go, im sure.. for family or other reasons......... and that may be whats holding them back
 
Our station is considered an ESSENTIAL part of emergency response and disaster recovery by our city officials. I was on the air on and off 9 to 1130pm one night and on and off again 6 to 3pm the next day at least twice every hour with information when the town flooded. THe following year, I was on the air at 1230am when water came up over the south end of the runway but did not flood the town.
And that's great. I'm sure the small town appreciates your efforts. Pats on the back and all, but to be clear, you aren't some big city PD/GM. The fact remains; it's a very small community. No need to act like it is something it's not.
You can believe we dont have that many listeners and while i cant prove otherwise, I know from lots of anecdotal conversations and whatforthnot, that it's the opposite of not many listeners.
Even you have admitted that with a high school graduating class that one can count on one hand, and an average listening count of between five and twenty on a typical day, your station in Alaska probably has more listeners at a time than your average Lower 48 LPFM, but not much. That's not a knock on what you do there in a small community, but it is still by standards, a very small community.
 
It sounds to me like you're the one who doesn't like him

That is not what BigA said.
and now you're just talking in circles in your usual effort to derail the point and drag the discussion nowhere.
You are reading stuff into his posts that are not there.
Man, you are on a roll. The company has not been Clear Channel in close to ten years.
Big A is simply making a reference into the way the company has been called, going back years.
 
Man, you are on a roll. The company has not been Clear Channel in close to ten years.

doesnt matter, thats a name people cant forget. .and cheap channel still kinda implies, depending on your POV and discussion being had.
 
I've seen some people looking for work for years, but theyve severely geographically restricted where theyll go, im sure.. for family or other reasons......... and that may be whats holding them back

That's what I was thinking about. Thanks to technology, some have been able to get both!
 
an average listening count of between five and twenty on a typical day,

I have never said that... and i can name a dozen people listening right now.

Again, this boils down to knowing listeners habits, which are hard to quantify. .,which i know well.

I'm sorry what i do and where i do doesnt fit the mold and what you believe, but im here... and thank god, youre not.

I know someone who knew you when you worked in Seattle and he said you were a knowitall then, I see nothing has changed.
 
doesnt matter, thats a name people cant forget. .and cheap channel still kinda implies, depending on your POV and discussion being had.
And it beats calling it iHateRadio or iHeart. Cheap Channel at least sounds like something an adult might say, rather than a 14-year-old.
 
There are lots of ways to make more money in the business if one is willing to look.

Thank you for making my point.

If you want to find a talented person to host your morning or afternoon drive show, you're not going to get "top tier talent" if your offer is "we'll pay you slightly more than you'd get by working at Taco Bell, but if you can pad your income with remote money, DJ gigs on the weekend, and driving Uber overnights, you can live the dream!"

And for god's sake don't name check Seacrest or Harvey and say "this could be you if you just work hard enough!" Yes, Ryan makes millions, but for every one of him (and there's just one) there are plenty of jocks that work for "cheap channel" (they earned that moniker) who hold down a midday show, act as MD, APD, and promo director for their local station while tracking half a dozen other regional markets while earning a salary that they could get as an assistant manager at Taco Bell. Sure, you add up all the side gigs and it's a living, but working 80 hours a week where your radio salary is less than half of your paycheck isn't exactly a recipe for attracting top talent.
 
If you want to find a talented person to host your morning or afternoon drive show, you're not going to get "top tier talent" if your offer is "we'll pay you slightly more than you'd get by working at Taco Bell,

The talent I know all make 6 figures. Just because you don't get those offers doesn't mean they don't exist. Maybe you need to work with a talent coach.
 
Steve Harvey is a nationally syndicated host with a whole team behind him, based at a big station in L.A. I'm sure there is plenty of content there. It's not representative of what I meant.
You are, as always, forgetting that radio can't do that in smaller markets as revenue in inflation adjusted dollars, is off about two-thirds in the last 20 years. So, outside of syndicated shows and big markets, there is no money to do those things elsewhere.

What you are asking is for like telling the gas station in Suttons Bay, MI, (population 601) to pay for a multi-bay electric vehicle charging setup. They can't afford it and the market won't sustain it.

Steve Harvey is representative of what I have long thought that radio should do: emulate the TV networks and, even, the streamed shows with national talent for all formats.

Essentially every significant European nation (I exclude nation states like Luxembourg and Andorra, for example) has radio formats that are national with total coverage of each country. They have strong hosts and well produced programs. U.S. radio had never done that thorough ownership, although a few individual talents have done that through syndication.

If various groups were to do station and market exchanges to insure coverage of at least the top 100 markets (maybe less PR and HI) they could do one format across the U.S. well, with talent and support teams. Doing what they are doing now is obviously not sustainable in a declining market.
 
The talent I know all make 6 figures. Just because you don't get those offers doesn't mean they don't exist. Maybe you need to work with a talent coach.
All of the talent? Really?

You pluck someone off the streets and hand them a six figure salary for doing 4 hours a day on one station? Do tell.

And honestly, the offers I've gotten since leaving the business were all "I'm sorry, but we can't afford that."
 
And it beats calling it iHateRadio or iHeart. Cheap Channel at least sounds like something an adult might say, rather than a 14-year-old.
It seems like those people who don't have the skills or experience to make it in a large group like iHeart, are generally the first to make up or repeat a childish play on words.
 
You are, as always, forgetting that radio can't do that in smaller markets as revenue in inflation adjusted dollars, is off about two-thirds in the last 20 years. So, outside of syndicated shows and big markets, there is no money to do those things elsewhere.

I am not forgetting. That was my point. Steve Harvey has a team of sidekicks and writers on a team designed to give the show content. And content is what is missing on the vast majority of shows I hear on the radio, especially outside of the morning drive.

BigA is the one who brought up Steve Harvey in a ridiculous attempt to twist my point. There's a lot of talk on the radio from hosts with nothing to say. Recycled jokes from the internet, snarky comments, or worse. That kind of host is indeed obsolete, it's part of the reason listeners have fled broadcast radio, and that's the subject of this thread.

Steve Harvey is representative of what I have long thought that radio should do: emulate the TV networks and, even, the streamed shows with national talent for all formats.

So tell that to your bestie instead of jumping to his defense by default every time.
 
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